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Paul Martin Schmidt

June 7, 1930 - March 26, 2018

Posted by:
Richard Hoyer

Posted on:
April 25, 2018

"Well done, good and faithful servant." The Word of the Lord. Thanks be to God.

Posted by:
Kevin Ziehr

Posted on:
April 24, 2018

Our deepest sympathy. My mother Mary Ann Stroebel Ziehr of Cisco, TX and Teeny are first cousins. Through the years, my parents and I had the privilege to visit with Paul and Teeny on their travels through Texas. My parents were saddened to receive the funeral notice in the mail last week. Again our deepest sympathy and Christ's blessings to your family at this time. Joe D. and Mary Ann Ziehr - Cisco, TX Kevin Ziehr - Fort Worth, TX

Posted by:
Mark F.Droegemueller

Posted on:
April 18, 2018

Greetings & My Sympathies To My Schmidt Cousins: My name is Mark F. Droegemueller. I am one of the youngest 1st cousins of your father, your Uncle Bob, and your Aunt Barb. My mother-- your Great Aunt Ruth was the youngest sister of your Grandfather Walter H. M. Schmidt. Your grandparents in their retirement years lived in East Troy, WI and my parents lived in retirement in Delavan, WI. I got to know your grandparents quite well in the 1970's and early 1980's. I was pallbearer at your Grandmother Gertrude Schmidt's funeral in 1983 and about 6 weeks later your Grandfather Walter Schmidt entered Heaven in July of 1983. I was a pallbearer for his gravesite service in July--however--I did not attend the memorial service of your grandfather in August of 1983. I saw your parents in Wichita, KS. at the LCMS National Convention in 1989. In 1992 I drove my parents to the New England States in early/mid July. On our return trip we stopped at LCMS Convention in Pittsburgh, PA and my parents and I got to see your parents. That was the last time my parents saw your mother and father. The last time that I saw your parents was at your Uncle Walter Karl's Memorial Service in St. Charles, IL. I have some lovely pictures of your parents, aunts, uncles, & cousins. Thanks to my parents and your Grandfather Walter Schmidt--I have learned many things about The Schmidt Family and The Droegemueller Family. Through your grandfather and my father--I have continued to be a family historian. Thank You Ann and Ben Hittle for informing me about your father's death. I notified other family members of his death. My condolences to you all. Your loved one is in Heaven, singing praises to our Lord and Savior. My prayers are with you at this time. I continue to pray for your dear mother. May Jesus watch over all of you now and in the days and years to come. Yours in Christ, Isaiah 12 Cousin Mark Droegemueller

Posted by:
Robert Schmidt

Posted on:
April 16, 2018

My name is Robert Schmidt. Below is what Paul has meant to me personally. As his brother, I wrote down a few thoughts for his family and some of his closest associates. Perhaps it will give you still another insight into Paul and what he meant to all of us. Here it is. My Etubum "Etubum" was what the Efik speaking people called missionaries in Nigeria. Not all missionaries were happy with the word. It originally referred to the white captain of a sailing ship (slave ship?) Nonetheless, the word stuck. My brother Paul was my "Etubum." As kids we enjoyed a canvas boat our father made. Later, separated by many miles we said, "if we ever live in the same place we will buy a boat. When we both moved to Portland, we bought the boat. Paul was the natural "Etubum" of the boat. He learned how to attach it to his van, keep it filled with oil, drive it to the destination, and keep the license up to date. With my own limited mechanical ability and even less interest I applauded his leadership. But that was always the pattern. Paul studied for the ministry. I wasn't sure I wanted to do that but because at Concordia, he had a lot of friends, I thought I would go there too. There were two Schmidts in his class, John and Paul. They called one "J" Schmidt and Paul, they called "P" Schmidt. He graduated from Concordia the year before I came. What did his friends call me? I was "little P" or in German "Erbsen." When he went to the seminary in St. Louis he worked at Reed Drug Store in University City. Once again he graduated the year before I came. But he put in a good word for me so when I arrived I also got to work at Reed's drug store. Years later, after many years in the ministry, Paul literally became my boss. I was serving as a campus pastor at the University of Washington in Seattle. Lo and behold, he became the executive secretary of missions for the Northwest District in charge of mission outreach and, among other things, campus ministry. Not a bad boss, he did keep reminding me that he was not sure for how many more years the District could afford full time campus pastors. Hmmn.... my Etubum! Though "Etubum" originally referred the master of a sailing ship, when applied to missionaries, the word over the years picked up other meanings. Etubum was the guy who would take a boy to the hospital if he fell out of a palm tree. Etubum would bring private communion to the sick and inquire about the health of everyone in the family. He would be a leader in evangelism bringing the Gospel to a new village. Etubum would walk in procession when an elder of the church died and they took him home to be buried under the kitchen floor. Paul was that kind of Etubum as well. He was a good pastor and a good brother in the faith in more ways than one. He had a great sense of humor which lightened up some of the dullest meetings. He wanted to share the good news of the Gospel which is why he wrote an evangelism series named, "The Gospel According to You." Though he loved the ministry, he could also poke fun at its pretence and silliness when with Dave Belasic he wrote, The Penguin Principles. In his note on my copy he wrote, "Bob, continue to love them as they are." As fellow retirees Paul and I talked about sermons, the ones we preached and the ones we listened to. He remarked that he wasn't all that sure what good they did. Yet, he said, At least when I preach I want people to hear some good news, good news for them and for their families. I guess that is what it is all about. My brother, Paul, .... my Etubum

Posted by:
Rev. Wilton Hille

Posted on:
April 16, 2018

When I was first called to St. Johns in Spokane, we were in a family crisis. Paul and Teeny became our rock of support and counselors. This was the start of a friendship that continued long after Paul left Beautiful Savor. Whenever we made a large pot of soup. we would call them over for dinner and they did the same for us. Paul was a man of wisdom. He had this as a rare gift from God. The thing which I will always remember about Paul was his humor and laughter. He was a blessing to us and to many others. Hew is now a child of God gone home. His memory remains deep within our hearts. Will and Sue Hille

Posted by:
Ann Hittle

Posted on:
April 5, 2018

My name is Ann Hittle, and I am Paul's only daughter. I wanted to share the post I shared with the students, and my colleagues at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, a new medical school where I work. Please feel free to share this link: https://www.blog.pnwu.edu/blog/2018/4/4/death-can-be-beautiful Ann

Posted by:
Robert Schmidt

Posted on:
April 1, 2018

I am Paul's brother Robert. Paul was on a list serve and I informed the list that he had died. The following are some comments from his colleagues. As you can see, he was well loved and appreciated. From Paul Schmidt's Colleagues Back in 1963, when I graduated from the seminary and moved to Redeemer, Spokane, WA., as Assistant Pastor, he was Pastor at a neighboring parish. He was my good mentor, model and encourager… especially when my senior pastor and friend, Rev. Arthur Fergin, died in a car accident 1 year to the day after my graduation. Dave Belasic Paul had a heart of gold. Herb Hoefer He has been a most kindly friend and colleague. Erhart Bauer Paul was always a dear and supportive friend. He also served shoulder to shoulder with my sainted wife Carol in the NOW Dist office. Both early risers the engaged in much mischief early in the morning at the Knott House decorating others desktops, hiding ugly art objects and consuming gallons of coffee from styro foam cups. I never see a Penguin without thinking of Paul. May the hope of resurrection sustain all who love him and encourage Teeny as she is able. Bill Warren Paul was a valuable colleague in the NAME network. It was easy to enjoy being in his company and to work with him on projects. I give thanks to the gift that he was to all of us. Richard Gahl Paul was a great guy to work with, especially when I was working to help establish Good Shepherd in East Vancouver. I appreciated his sense of humor, and the malapropisms he quoted. There was much wisdom in the Penguin Principles that he and Dave Belasic authored. Dell Schomburg Paul was a great pastoral role model for me, esp. when I returned to the NW District in 1993. Herb is exactly right: Paul had a heart of gold. He had a graceful way of "tweaking" those who needed "tweaking" (including yours truly, when I helped to write the history of the NW District and inadvertently neglected to include in a chapter some district leaders who needed to be mentioned), always with a genuine smile and true pastoral concern for all involved. His teaching about "local fellowship" ought to be more widely known and heeded. Matthew Becker I knew Paul through the Northwest District Office; and got to know him as a caring individual. I was always made to feel special in that he knew me by name. That meant a lot to a young pastor who often felt out of place. Robert Bjornstad We have been friends since the mid 1960’s when we did a week long high school youth event together at Concordia. We served on a few committees together over the years, and most recently Paul was part of our retired pastors Bible Study group. Paul was a good listener and when he spoke, people listened. He was a wise man of humility and grace, with a perspective on the Church Catholic and community and individuals that is rare. I thank God for him - and for you! “Thanks be to God who gives us the victory through Christ Jesus our Lord!” Tyrus Miles Dave Belasic and Paul Schmidt co-authored "The Penguin Principles", a light-hearted but very practical guide for surviving in the parish ministry... It was published by CSS Publishing in Lima, Ohio. Later, after Dave became President of the Eastern District, the President of CPH approached him at a Synodical Convention and asked, "Dave, why didn't you let CPH publish your book?" Dave replied, "We sent it to you, but you rejected it." And he responded, "Oh." As it turned out "The Penguin Principles" turned out to be the best-selling book CSS ever published. Paul Doellinger

Posted by:
Daphne Schmidt

Posted on:
March 30, 2018

Paul was my father-in-law, and I was so very Blessed to know him for 16 years. He showed us all what true character, grace, wisdom and love looks like. His four children David, Ann, Joel (my wonderful husband of 16 years), and Dan are each amazing people in their own right; Paul's influence and legacy is reflected, and shines on brightly in each of them, in different ways. We will miss him so.